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This is NEPCA's official website, containing both information about the organization and the latest news about the profession.

2018 NEPCA Conference

NEPCA’s 2018 Fall Conference will be held at Worcester State University in Worcester, MA OCTOBER 19-20, 2018.

Proposals due before June 1, 2108.

Peter C. Rollins Book Prize

The deadline for publishers to submit nominations for the 2017 Rollins Prize is July 1, 2018. This prize will honor the best book written by a scholar working in New England or New York on a topic pertaining to popular or/and American culture during the year 2017.

Carol Mitchell and Amos St.. Germain Graduate Paper Prizes. Rolling date for consideration until July 1. Papers must be nominated by panel chair.

CFP: Sports and Sexual Violation

CFP: “The Psychology and History of Sexual Violation in Sport and Its Condemnation”

by Bob Lentz

Journal: Clio’s Psyche, Fall 2018 Special Feature Issue

Due Date: April 30, 2018

Why has sexual violation by powerful men in sport (recently gymnastics, previously hockey)—covered up, denied, suppressed, and repressed for so long—become a powerful theme in the American media since the fall of 2017?  Why are coaches, trainers, and doctors, whose predecessors usually got away with sexual assault, now being exposed, shamed, forced to resign, and convicted for unwanted touching and worse?  In the Fall 2018 Special Feature Issue of Clio’s Psyche we are searching for psychodynamic answers and are looking now for articles commenting on one or more of the following:

  • The athlete-victims’ feelings and trauma
  • The varied responses to charges of sexual abuse – especially denial and inaction by parents and officials
  • The Dr. Larry Nassar case
  • Ethical, competency, and certification issues from a psychological perspective
  • Why in America and why now have the barriers to making these issues public broken down?
  • Is the openness about these abuses related to Donald Trump and the Trump presidency?
  • The #MeToo movement
  • Cases of a rush to judgment without due process, ruining a person’s career
  • Fantasies of sexual intrusion
  • Sexual abuse and sexual fantasy in the Freudian tradition
  • Sexual privilege and violation in the history of sport

We seek articles from 500-2,500 words—including seven to ten keywords, a 100-word abstract, and your brief biography ending in your e-mail address—by April 30, 2018.  An abstract or outline by April 1, 2018 or soon thereafter would be helpful.  Send them as attached Microsoft Word document (*.docx) files to cliospsycheeditor@gmail.com.

It our style to publish thought-provoking, clearly written articles based upon psychological/psychoanalytic insight; developed with examples from history, current events, and the human experience; and without psychoanalytic/psychological terminology or jargon and without foot/endnotes or a bibliography (use internal citations for quotations).  Submissions the editors deem suitable are anonymously refereed.

Clio’s Psyche is in its 24th year of publication by the Psychohistory Forum.  Please visit our website at cliospsyche.org.

Contact co-editors Paul Elovitz, PhD, at cliospsycheeditor@gmail.com or Eva Fogelman, PhD, at evafogman@aol.com regarding this CFP.

PCA Governing Board Election Results

Results of the 2018 PCA Governing Board Election

Vice President for Area Chairs and Programming: David Silverman
Vice President for Awards: Sue Matheson

Governing Board Members At Large:
Brenda Boudreau
Ashley Donnelly
Elizabeth Downey
Helen Lewis

CFP: Corporeal Media

CFP: Corporeal Media

Edited by Anne Pasek & Radha S. Hegde
Commentary & Criticism
Feminist Media Studies

It is time for feminist media studies to refocus its attention on the body. Bodies matter in the ways in which they are differentiated, valued, shared, disrupted, erased and spectacularized. In the current geopolitical and technologized context, the body is not only an object of cultural representation but also a medium through which economic and environmental forces circulate. The body is therefore often a surface on which particular knowledges and harms are inscribed.

This issue of Commentary and Criticism invites brief position papers/think pieces that engage with bodies in their geopolitical particularities as extensions of media systems and their material infrastructures. Inspired by both old and new materialisms, we welcome essays that address embodied experiences, physical symptoms, labor practices and corporeal regimes that speak to ways of knowing massively-distributed media networks and/or sketch new directions for feminist media studies.

Corporeal analytics invite feminist, anti-colonial, anti-racist, transnational, crip, and queer perspectives. Accordingly, possible paper topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Toxics, slow violence, and neo-colonialism
  • Time, technology, networks, and their physicality
  • Risk, health and the laboring body in media(ted) industries
  • Surveillance and corporeal borders
  • Interfaces, sensors and bodily norms

We are particularly interested in submissions from beyond North America and the UK.

Submission Instructions

The Commentary and Criticism section of Feminist Media Studies aims to publish brief (~1000 words), timely responses to current issues in feminist media culture, for an international readership. Submissions may pose a provocation, describe work in progress, or propose areas for future study. We will also consider book and event reviews, as well as contributions that depart from traditional academic formats. We encourage all submissions to strategically mobilize critique to offer a productive contribution to both feminist politics and media studies. Submissions must go beyond mere description in order to be considered for publication in Commentary and Criticism.

Please submit full contributions by 15 September 2018, via email to Anne Pasek. Questions and expressions of interest can also be addressed to Anne Pasek in advance of the deadline. Submissions for Commentary and Criticism will not be correctly processed if submitted through the main Feminist Media Studies site.

Contact Email:

We All Love Frank(enstein) at NEPCA

Frankenstein 1818 to 2018: 200 Years of Mad Scientists and Monsters (Final Call for Papers)

A Special Session of the Fantastic (Fantasy, Horror, and Science Fiction) Area of the Northeast Popular Culture/American Culture Association

Worcester State University, Worcester, Massachusetts

19-20 October 2018

Proposals due 1 June 2018

 

In this panel, the Fantastic (Fantasy, Horror, and Science Fiction) Area of the Northeast Popular Culture/American Culture Association seeks to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the publication of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein in 1818 by celebrating the longevity of her iconic characters of scientist Victor Frankenstein, “the pale student of unhallowed arts,” and his monstrous construct, “the thing he had put together,” as she succinctly describes them in her introduction to the 1831 reissue of the work.

Proposals for papers should explore aspects of Shelley’s versions of Frankenstein or his creations (both the Creature as well as its Bride) as representations of the fantastic and/or of the afterlife of these figures in later fantastic narratives of any genre or medium in which adaptations and appropriations of the Frankenstein story have occurred.

Be advised that presentations will be limited to 15 or 20 minutes in length depending on final panel size.

Ideas and resources for the study of Frankenstein and its progeny can be accessed at Frankenstein and the Fantastic, an outreach effort of the Fantastic (Fantasy, Horror, and Science Fiction) Area, based at https://FrankensteinandtheFantastic.blogspot.com/.

 

Please contact area chair Michael A. Torregrossa at FrankensteinandtheFantastic@gmail.com, using “Frankenstein 1818 to 2018” as your subject line, with any questions in advance of the 1 June 2018 deadline.

Submissions should be made online through the “2018 Proposal Form” at https://nepca.blog/2018-conference/. Please select “The Fantastic (Fantasy, Horror, and Science Fiction)” as your designated area. A complete submission includes contact information, academic affiliation (if any), an academic biographical statement (between 50 and 200 words), a paper title (no more than 60 characters), and a paper abstract (no more than 250 words). Do also send copies of your biography and proposal to the area chair at FrankensteinandtheFantastic@gmail.com, using “Frankenstein 1818 to 2018” as your subject line.

 

The Northeast Popular/American Culture Association (a.k.a. NEPCA) was founded in 1974 as a professional organization for scholars living in New England and New York. It is a community of scholars interested in advancing research and promoting interest in the disciplines of popular and/or American culture. NEPCA’s membership consists of university and college faculty members, emeriti faculty, secondary school teachers, museum specialists, graduate students, independent scholars, and interested members of the general public. NEPCA is an independently funded affiliate of the Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association. Membership is open to all interested parties, regardless of profession, rank, or residency. NEPCA holds an annual conference that invites scholars from around the globe to participate. In an effort to keep costs low, it meets on college campuses throughout the region.

 

Membership in NEPCA is required for participation and annual dues are included in conference registration fees. Further details are available at https://nepca.blog/membership-information/.

 

CFP: The Fantastic for NEPCA

Fantastic (Fantasy, Horror, and Science Fiction) Area

Eleventh-Anniversary and Farewell Sessions

 

2018 Conference of the Northeast Popular Culture/American Culture Association (NEPCA)

Worcester State University, Worcester, Massachusetts

19-20 October 2018

Proposals due 1 June 2018

 

Formed in 2008, the Fantastic (Fantasy, Horror, and Science Fiction) Area will hold its eleventh-anniversary and farewell sessions in 2018, and we seek proposals from scholars of all levels for papers and/or panels that explore any aspect of the intermedia traditions of the fantastic (including, but not limited to, elements of fairy tale, fantasy, gothic, horror, legend, mythology, and science fiction) and how creative artists have altered our preconceptions of these subtraditions by producing innovative works in diverse countries, media, and time periods and for audiences at all levels.

Presentations will be limited to 15 or 20 minutes in length depending on final panel size.

An archive of previous work in the area exists at our website Northeast Fantastic (https://northeastfantastic.blogspot.com), which is intended as a gateway to furthering research on the fantastic.

 

Special Topics:

Given the proximity of the conference to Halloween, we are always interested in proposals related to monsters and the monstrous.

This year, we are also looking for papers related to the fantastic in children’s culture, especially the works of the Walt Disney Company.

Furthermore, in celebration of the two hundredth anniversary of the publication of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein in 2018, we are organizing a special session devoted to “Frankenstein 1818 to 2018: 200 Years of Mad Scientists and Monsters.” Details can at our outreach site Frankenstein and the Fantastic at https://FrankensteinandtheFantastic.blogspot.com/.

 

Directions for Submission:

Please contact area chair Michael A. Torregrossa at cfp.nepcafantastic@gmail.com, using “NEPCA Fantastic 2018” as your subject line, with any questions in advance of the 1 June 2018 deadline.

Submissions for papers and/or panels should be made online through the “2018 Proposal Form” at https://nepca.blog/2018-conference/. Please select “The Fantastic (Fantasy, Horror, and Science Fiction)” as your designated area. A complete submission includes contact information, academic affiliation (if any), an academic biographical statement (between 50 and 200 words), a paper title (no more than 60 characters), and a paper abstract (no more than 250 words). Do also send copies of your biography and proposal to the area chair at cfp.nepcafantastic@gmail.com, using “NEPCA Fantastic 2018” as your subject line.

 

 

The Northeast Popular/American Culture Association (a.k.a. NEPCA) was founded in 1974 as a professional organization for scholars living in New England and New York. It is a community of scholars interested in advancing research and promoting interest in the disciplines of popular and/or American culture. NEPCA’s membership consists of university and college faculty members, emeriti faculty, secondary school teachers, museum specialists, graduate students, independent scholars, and interested members of the general public. NEPCA is an independently funded affiliate of the Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association. Membership is open to all interested parties, regardless of profession, rank, or residency. NEPCA holds an annual conference that invites scholars from around the globe to participate. In an effort to keep costs low, it meets on college campuses throughout the region.

 

Membership in NEPCA is required for participation and annual dues are included in conference registration fees. Further details are available at https://nepca.blog/membership-information/.

Monsters and Medievalism CFP

Sponsored by The Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture for the Medieval & Renaissance Area of the Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association

29th Annual Conference of the Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association

Lord Baltimore Hotel, Baltimore, Maryland

8-10 November 2018

Proposals due by 30 June 2018

Monsters remain fascinating subjects, and intense discussion in recent years has focused on their representation in medieval texts, including stories as well as the art of the period. However, scholars have largely neglected the post-medieval afterlife of these horrors in later works. Monstrous entities manufactured to exist within re-creations of the Middle Ages in contemporary media share a similar fate in the academy. In short, medievalists appear to like monsters, but they do not always seem willing to explore their depictions in modern texts. Despite this neglect, the monsters found in medievalisms have merit in our classrooms and research, and we need to promote their exploits as well as those of the creatures existing within medieval artifacts.

In furtherance of the goals of The Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture, we seek in this panel to unite Medieval Studies, Medievalism Studies, Monster Studies, and Popular Culture Studies to highlight connections between medieval monstrosities and their post-medieval incarnations and successors. We hope to explore both continuity and change in addressing how terrors rooted in the medieval have been portrayed and how their inheritors have been developed.

Possible topics might include:

Demons

Dracula

Dragons

Elves/Fairies/Tuatha Dé Danann

Fomorians

Gargoyles

Giants

Golems

The Green Knight

The Grendelkin

Incubi/Sucubi

Loathly Ladies

Melusine

Merlin

Revenants

Shrek

Werewolves

Wild Men / Wild Women

Witches

Presentations will be limited to 10-15 minutes depending on final panel size.

Interested individuals should, no later than 30 June 2018, notify the organizers of their topic via email directed to MedievalinPopularCulture@gmail.com using “Monsters and Medievalism” as their subject heading. They will also need create an account with the Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association at https://mapaca.net/conference AND submit into the system both an abstract of no more than 300 words and an academic biographical narrative of no more than 75 words.

Again, please send inquiries and copies of your submissions to the organizers at MedievalinPopularCulture@gmail.com using “Monsters and Medievalism” as the subject heading.

In planning your proposal, please be aware of the policies of the Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association (available at https://mapaca.net/help/conference/submitting-abstracts-conference).

Further details on The Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture can be found at its website: https://medievalinpopularculture.blogspot.com/.

Sponsored by The Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture for the Medieval & Renaissance Area of the Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association

29th Annual Conference of the Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association

Lord Baltimore Hotel, Baltimore, Maryland

8-10 November 2018

Proposals due by 30 June 2018

Monsters remain fascinating subjects, and intense discussion in recent years has focused on their representation in medieval texts, including stories as well as the art of the period. However, scholars have largely neglected the post-medieval afterlife of these horrors in later works. Monstrous entities manufactured to exist within re-creations of the Middle Ages in contemporary media share a similar fate in the academy. In short, medievalists appear to like monsters, but they do not always seem willing to explore their depictions in modern texts. Despite this neglect, the monsters found in medievalisms have merit in our classrooms and research, and we need to promote their exploits as well as those of the creatures existing within medieval artifacts.

In furtherance of the goals of The Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture, we seek in this panel to unite Medieval Studies, Medievalism Studies, Monster Studies, and Popular Culture Studies to highlight connections between medieval monstrosities and their post-medieval incarnations and successors. We hope to explore both continuity and change in addressing how terrors rooted in the medieval have been portrayed and how their inheritors have been developed.

Possible topics might include:

Demons

Dracula

Dragons

Elves/Fairies/Tuatha Dé Danann

Fomorians

Gargoyles

Giants

Golems

The Green Knight

The Grendelkin

Incubi/Sucubi

Loathly Ladies

Melusine

Merlin

Revenants

Shrek

Werewolves

Wild Men / Wild Women

Witches

Presentations will be limited to 10-15 minutes depending on final panel size.

Interested individuals should, no later than 30 June 2018, notify the organizers of their topic via email directed to MedievalinPopularCulture@gmail.com using “Monsters and Medievalism” as their subject heading. They will also need create an account with the Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association at https://mapaca.net/conference AND submit into the system both an abstract of no more than 300 words and an academic biographical narrative of no more than 75 words.

Again, please send inquiries and copies of your submissions to the organizers at MedievalinPopularCulture@gmail.com using “Monsters and Medievalism” as the subject heading.

In planning your proposal, please be aware of the policies of the Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association (available at https://mapaca.net/help/conference/submitting-abstracts-conference).

Further details on The Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture can be found at its website: https://medievalinpopularculture.blogspot.com/.

CFP for Book on Soccer

As the most popular mass spectator sport across the world, soccer generates key moments of significance on and off the field, encapsulated in events that create metaphors and memories, with wider social, cultural, psychological, political, commercial and aesthetic implications. Since its inception as a modern game, the history of soccer is replete with events that have changed not only the organization of the sport but also its meanings and impact. The passage from the local to the global, or from the club to the national often opens up transnational spaces which provide a context for studying the events that have ‘defined’ the sport since its codification in the late nineteenth century. Such defining events can include performances on the field of play, decisions taken by various stakeholders associated with the game, accidents and violence among players and fans, invention of supporter cultures, and so on. A study of these events provides an excellent opportunity to understand the evolution of the game from an interdisciplinary and comparative perspective that enriches the potential of writing connected histories in the domain of soccer. It helps us rethink peoples’ perception of soccer as a specific form of popular culture and public memory with deep psycho-social roots, connecting the past, the present and the future of the game’s evolution as part of everyday life. At the same time, explorations into the defining events in soccer can contribute to the debate on the interdependence of events and narratives. An investigation into why some moments were more important than others to certain people could complicate our understanding of the historicity and interpretation of events.

The proposed special issue intends to document, identify and analyze some of the defining events in the history of soccer by revisiting the discourses of signification and memorialization of such events that influence society, culture, politics, religion, and commerce. While the history of soccer is too vast a canvas to focus on such key moments in a single volume, this collection would attempt to bring together scholars from various backgrounds to reflect upon some of the key moments in the local, regional, national and global histories of soccer from different perspectives.

How to submit your abstract

We invite 300-word abstracts for articles for the special issue. Selected papers will be published as a special issue of Soccer & Society, and later as a book in Routledge’s Sport in the Global Society-Contemporary Perspectives series. Since the special issue is being planned to commemorate the FIFA World Cup 2018, contributions on the defining events in the history of the FIFA World Cup are particularly encouraged.

DEADLINES

Submission of abstract with title: 15 March 2018

Intimation to authors of selected papers: 31 March 2018

Submission of the first draft: 31 August 2018

Communication to authors of comments/queries after review: 31 October 2018

Submission of the final paper: 15 December 2018

All submissions are to be sent to: kbanjee@yahoo.co.in and souviknaha@gmail.com

Editorial information

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