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New York Public Library Research Fellowships

The New York Public Library is pleased to offer short-term research fellowships to support graduate-level, post-doctoral, and independent researchers.  Individuals needing to conduct on-site research in the Library’s special collections to support projects in the humanities, business, and the fine and performing arts are encouraged to apply.

Fellowship stipends are $1,000 per week for a minimum of two and maximum of four weeks.  Each fellow is expected to be in residence at the Library for the duration of their fellowship and to write a blog post for nypl.org about their work with the Library’s collections.

The Manuscripts and Archives Division of The New York Public Library holds over 29,000 linear feet of material in over 5,500 collections, with strengths in the papers and records of individuals, families, and organizations, primarily from the New York region. These collections support research in the political, economic, social, and cultural history of New York and the United States.

The Rare Book Collection contains over 350,000 printed volumes, pamphlets, broadsides, and newspapers, in addition to thousands of pieces of ephemera.  It is especially rich in fifteenth century printing, Americana, voyages and travels, early Bibles, and literature.

Visit https://www.nypl.org/research-divisions/ for more information about these and other divisions available for fellowship research.

Detailed program information can be found at https://www.nypl.org/help/about-nypl/fellowships-institutes/short-term-research-fellowships, and Library holdings can be explored atcatalog.nypl.org and archives.nypl.org.

To apply, submit an online application at https://fellowships.nypl.org/home.  Fellowships are open to U.S. citizens, permanent residents, and foreign nationals who have been resident in the United States for the three years as of January 31, 2018.  Fellows must reside outside the New York metropolitan area.

Application Deadline:  February 15, 2018

Notification Date:  March 31, 2018

Fellowship Period:  June 1, 2018 – May 30, 2019

Contact Info:

Meredith Mann | The New York Public Library
Librarian

Stephen A. Schwarzman Building
Brooke Russell Astor Reading Room for Manuscripts, Archives, and Rare Books
476 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10018

Contact Email:

Phillips Library Moving

The Phillips Library at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts is one of the nation’s premiere scholarly collections in American history and literature.  Since 2011, it has been virtually closed to scholars as the Museum has undergone extensive renovation.  The Peabody Essex Museum has moved most of the collection to the town of Rowley, 16 miles from Salem, and has presented plans to the city of Salem to keep the collection off-site permanently.

Because of public and scholarly concern about this move, the Peabody Essex Museum will convene a public meeting on Thursday, January 11, at 6 p.m. in the Morse Auditorium, 161 Essex Street, Salem, Massachusetts to present their long-term plans for the Phillips Library.

Contact Info:

Donald R. Friary
President, Colonial Society of Massachusetts

10 Broad Street
Salem, Massachusetts 01970
978-745-0184, fax 978-745-7471

Contact Email:

CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS: H-Sport Teaching Initiative – Syllabi and Assignments

H-SPORT is currently seeking contributions for our Teaching Initiative project. Presently, we are looking for syllabi and assignments that focus on media, literature, philosophy, law, policy, management, sociology, and history of sport. Because we are an interdisciplinary list other categories in the sport-teaching field are also welcome. Our goal with the Teaching Initiative project is to offer a place where instructors and researchers can share information regarding syllabi, course assignments, and reading lists, as well other educational materials related to the sport-teaching field. When submitting syllabi and/or assignments, please include information, such as course name, the level of the course (undergraduate or graduate), school name, and in which specific category you would like your syllabus to be listed under (this will help us divide the materials into the specific categories).

Please send submissions as .docx, .doc, or .pdf. In the subject line, include your LAST NAMETEACHING INITIATIVE, and the SPECIFC CATEGORY YOU WOULD LIKE YOUR SYLLABUS AND/OR ASSIGNMENT TO BE LISTED UNDER. For example, Jones_Teaching Initiative_Media.

Please send all submissions to Tanya Lovejoy (H-Sport List Editor) at tlovejoy@siu.edu.

The most recent submissions can be accessed on the H-Sport Teaching Initiative page. The syllabi are filed under specific categories on the main Teaching Initiative page.  A link to the Teaching Initiative Project page can also be found on the right-hand menu on the main H-Sport page. The H-Sport Teaching Initiative is an ongoing project and H-Sport looks forward to adding other sport-teaching materials in the future.

Please note: All material has been submitted courtesy of the authors. All material remains the intellectual property of the authors and should not be redistributed or used for commercial purposes without the consent of the authors.

Seeking Hosts for the Podcast New Books in Sports

New Books in Sports (http://newbooksnetwork.com/category/sports/) is currently seeking hosts interested in conducting interviews with authors of new books on sports. Hosting the channel is a good way to bring the work of sports scholars to the attention of large audiences. Interested parties should write Marshall Poe at marshallpoe@gmail.com.

New Books in Sports is part of the New Books Network (http://newbooksnetwork.com), a non-profit consortium of 81 author-interview podcasts focused on academic books. The NBN serves 25,000 episodes a day to a worldwide audience. Its mission is outreach and public education.

Revised Edition of the Historical Dictionary of New England

 

 

 

Longtime NEPCA member and former president Peter C. Holloran (Worcester State University) has published a revised and expanded second edition of Historical Dictionary of New England (Rowman & Littlefield).

Pop Culture Institute at Bowling Green

“Exploring the Archives: Fifty Years of Popular Culture”
For the second time, the PCA/ACA and Bowling Green State University are jointly sponsoring a summer research institute on the Bowling Green, Ohio campus from Sunday, May 21 through Thursday, May 25, 2017. This institute will introduce a small group of scholars from across the country and abroad to the research and pedagogical treasures of BGSU’s very special collections.
The staff of these exceptional collections will assist institute participants in locating unique resources for use in their teaching and research in accordance with Fair Use guidelines. In addition, volunteer faculty scholars from both BGSU and PCA/ACA will lend their time and expertise to help participants with their own individual projects.
A limited number of $400 travel grants are available for participants.
For more information, please visit the following link(s):

http://pcaaca.org/educatio/pcaaca-research-workshop/

Theo Bikel: Revisiting the American Folk Music Revival

THEODORE BIKEL

While I’m Here

Red House 286

 

imgres-9-59-37-amTheo Bikel’s While I’m Here is a magical trip down Memory Lane. If this name rings no bells, your cultural/musical education contains a gap that this double-CD can bridge. Bikel (1924-2015) was a seminal figure in the middle period of the Folk Revival (1947-1965).

Bikel was born in Vienna, fled to Palestine during the Nazi years, moved to London to become an actor, immigrated to the United States in 1954, and became a citizen in 1961. His contributions to the Folk Revival notwithstanding, he was even better known for his acting chops. How many folk singers do you know that have been nominated for Academy Awards and Tony Awards, served as president of Actors’ Equity, and played Worf’s father on Star Trek? His is the record-holder for portraying Tevye (Fiddler on the Roof), and the role of Captain von Trapp in The Sound of Music was invented for Bikel to display his vocal prowess. Ever hear the song “Edelweiss?” Of course you have; it was penned by Oscar Hammerstein especially for Bikel

If it strikes you as odd that Bikel also picked up an acoustic guitar and sang at folk clubs, another short history lesson. During the Folk Revival, stories were as important as the songs, and no music devotee dreamt of yelling out, “Shut up and sing!” Who better than an actor to spin good yarns? To mention a few others who went a similar route, Alan Arkin was one-third of The Tarriers, who had several best-selling records; and most of The Clancy Brothers hit the boards before they hit the charts. (Contemporary actors such as Steve Martin, Gwyneth Paltrow, Creed Bratton, and Kevin Bacon tread in these footsteps in reverse, and tons of actors rock or rap.)

Bikel hit the USA at time during the Folk Revival when Americans were discovering the world: Alan Lomax trotted across the planet to record international folk music, Pete Seeger whistled both traditional and revolutionary Chinese ditties, and country singers discovered that “Appalachian” music had English or Scottish roots. Bikel fit in well—he was the genuine article, a Jew with an inherited trove of Yiddish and Hebrew songs, facility with 21 languages, and a born shanachie. The first CD of While I’m Here is entirely storytelling—most of it autobiographical in content but spellbinding in nature. Imagine a Yiddish Garrison Keillor and you begin to conjure the worlds Bikel recreates. One could teach an awful lot of immigration history through Bikel’s words—especially the lure of America in the post-World War Two years.

Some listeners may find Bikel’s songs too mannered. This too was common during the Folk Revival, with Bikel fitting the mold of other “stagey” singers such as John Jacob Niles. He was not a songwriter; Bikel interpreted the compositions of others, including the album’s title track, penned by Phil Ochs. One of his signature songs, “The Lady is Waiting,” came from Paul Williams, and Bikel wasn’t particular about original sources, as long as he liked the song. Another favorite was “Pourquoi Je Chante,” from Egyptian-French-Italian-Greek composer Giuseppe Mustacchi. Bikel also fashioned sets that contained Yiddish songs, contemporary international folk, and show tunes. He cofounded the Newport Folk Festival (1959) and inspired such next-wave Folk Revivalists as Judy Collins, Peter Yarrow, and some guy named Dylan, as well as Jac Holzman, who went on to produce everyone from The Doors to The Stooges.

Bikel belonged to the generation of folkies defiant of the 1950s Red Scare and 1960s reactionaries. He was an unapologetic Zionist and remained an activist even when it passed from fashion (which is more than can be said of Dylan). The second CD opens with “Wasn’t That a Mighty Day?” which Bikel reworked to protest the ill treatment of Hurricane Katrina survivors. Bikel was a lifelong civil rights activist; hence the collection also contains “Oh Freedom.”

In brief, Theo Bikel was an important figure—an icon of artistic achievement, creativity force, and humanitarianism. Bikel passed last year, but continues to inspire folks such as Cathy Fink, who co-produced this retrospective, and Judy Collins, who wrote a loving tribute. If you already know about Bikel, spread the word; if not, time to complete your education, friend.

Rob Weir

PS: I’d recommend buying the CD, not a download, because the 24-page liner booklet is an education in its own right.