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CFP: Articles on Black Womanhood

Open Cultural Studies

Peer-Reviewed Journal by De Gruyter Open

CFP: Black Womanhood in Popular Culture

Editors: Dr Katharina Gerund (Erlangen/Nürnberg); Dr Stefanie Schäfer (Jena)

contemporary popular culture, black womanhood frequently takes centre stage. It occupies an increasingly central place and articulates new and renewed dimensions, prompting questions about the status of black women in the cultural imaginary of the US and beyond. Most prominently, Michelle Obama’s First Ladyship has sparked scholarly and media discussions around the significance of stereotypes associated with black women, the possibilities and limitations of public figures to create new images and anchor them in the cultural imaginary, and about the subject positions and images that express and shape constructions of black womanhood (cf. Harris-Perry 2011, Schäfer 2015, Spillers 2009). Further examples include the pop singer Beyoncé, who has proclaimed her commitment to feminism and designed an already iconic celebration of black motherhood (concerning Afro-futurist tropes), wildly popular TV shows like Scandal or How to Get Away with Murder which feature black female protagonists, or literary works and feminist manifestos such as Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Americanah (2013) or We Should All Be Feminists (2014) and Dear Ijeawele, or A Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions (2017).

 

Our special issue aims to examine the multifaceted ideological implications of this proliferation of black womanhood in popular culture. We understand popular culture as a site where “collective social understandings are created” (cf. Stuart Hall 2009) and as a marketplace governed primarily by economic interests, but also trading in symbolic capital, identities, and collective fantasies. Popular culture thus may model new subject positions, unsettle cultural authorities, and question cultural ideals – intentionally or inadvertently so. The contributions to this special issue discuss representations and performances of black womanhood in the transatlantic sphere. They raise issues about the genealogies of these images and their empowering and limiting qualities, about the “affective agency” (Rebecca Wanzo) and subjecthood that black women claim and/or are assigned in these cultural productions, and about the signifying functions of the black female body in visual economies: How does contemporary popular culture negotiate, revise, or recalibrate stereotypical depictions of black women? How can representations of black womanhood be discussed from different theoretical vantage points, such as Afro-Pessimism, Critical Race Studies, Black Feminism? And how can they be positioned within new formations of the Black Atlantic, within (trans)national “affective economies” (Sara Ahmed) and contemporary discourses on race, class, gender, and age in the US and beyond?

 

Contributions may address a broad range of topics, pertaining to e.g. visual culture (comics, films, TV shows, etc.), material culture and bodily practices, literature, performances, or the arts. We welcome academic essays as well as images to our volume. Issues to be explored include but are not limited to:

·                Black women as cultural agents

·                Feminist agendas and their representation in cultural discourses

·                Epistemologies of black womanhood and systems of knowledge production

·                Afropessimisms and ontologies of black subjecthood

·                Histories and genealogies of representing black womanhood

Contact Info:

Please submit abstracts (500 words maximum) and biographical information to Dr Katharina Gerund (Erlangen/Nürnberg) and Dr Stefanie Schäfer (Jena): stefanie@uni-jena.de and katharina.gerund@fau.deby January 15, 2018Manuscripts of 5000 to 7000 words will be due by May 1, 2018.

CFP: American Humor

Studies in American Humor (StAH), a member of the Council of Editors of Learned Journals (CELJ), has published scholarly critical essays, review essays, and book reviews on all aspects of American humor since 1974.  The premier journal for scholarship on humor, StAH addresses a wide spectrum of American humor, past and present.  As a service to its audience of scholars and students in the humanities, especially literary, cultural, and media studies, StAH has featured  an annual review of current scholarship, “The Year’s Work in American Humor Studies,” since 1999.

Submission Information                                                                

Submissions of essay manuscripts between 5000 and 8000 words are welcome on any topic, theme, practice, practitioner, and medium of American humor. StAH values transnational and interdisciplinary approaches as well as traditional critical and historical humanities scholarship. We are particularly interested in publishing essays on the visual humor of comics and animated cartoons; varieties of ethnic humor (African-American, Asian-American, Latinx, and Native American); online humor; television humor (late-night satire  sketch comedy, and sit-coms); stand-up; vaudeville; and antebellum literary humor. One electronic copy of a manuscript should be submitted in Word or rtf format with documentation in Chicago endnote style following The Chicago Manual of Style (16th edition) to the journal’s online Editorial Manager portal http://www.editorialmanager.com/sah/; accompanying illustrations should be provided in jpg format. Additional details are available at our editorial portal and at <http://www.studiesinamericanhumor.org>. Authors are responsible for securing permissions if their accepted submissions contain copyrighted material beyond fair use.

The journal also invites individuals to send books for review; books and essays for our annual feature, “The Year’s Work in American Humor Studies”; and previously unpublished (or long lost) primary sources with short analytical essays for our occasional feature, “The Recovery Room.”

Essay submissions and other materials in electronic form for “The Recovery Room” should be submitted via the Editorial Manager portal at the address above.  Please submit other publication queries to Lawrence Howe, Editor of Studies in American Humor, at StudiesinAmericanHumor@roosevelt.edu. Books and inquiries about book reviews should be sent to David Gillota, Associate Editor.

All contributors must be members in good standing of the American Humor Studies Association (AHSA) at the time of publication. Membership information is available via the AHSA website: <http://americanhumorstudiesassociation.wordpress.com/>.

Contact Info:

Christy Zempter, Managing Editor, Studies in American Humor

cz346213@ohio.edu

Information Clearing House

Looking for information on upcoming conferences in your area, across the country, or abroad. Check out the H-Net announcements board for this and other opportunities.

Racism and Discrimination in Sports

What is it about culture and society that creates an environment in which an athlete is able to excel or fail in his/her respective sport? Which factors, such as racism, discrimination, financial advantage or hardship, propel or hinder an athlete’s achievements? This volume seeks to explore how the world of sports is often a microcosm of the real world and the many ways in which it uniquely reflects cultural and societal issues. Abstracts are welcomed from all disciplines. Articles should either favor a historicist approach or be grounded in discourse analysis.

Abstract Due Dates: Preference will be given to abstracts received by October 15, 2017 and should be no longer than 300 words. Please also include a brief biographical statement and a CV. The book is going to be published by Universitas Press in spring 2018 (www.universitaspress.com).
Final manuscripts (no longer than 15,000 words, including Works Cited) should be submitted in MLA style, by December 15, 2017.

Send inquires and abstracts to: eangelini1@verizon.net

Contact Info:

Eileen M. Angelini, Ph.D.
Fulbright Scholar and Chevalier dans l’Ordre des Palmes Académiques
East VP and Newsletter Editor, Pi Delta Phi National French Honor Society
New York State Representative for Women in French

Contact Email:

Sports History Anthology

Routledge Books has requested a proposal for a sports media history anthology.  The book will cover all periods and all forms of media and will serve as a standard reference for students, academics, and other interested professionals.  The book will focus on the interplay of sports, media, and global culture at various points of history, with chapters that stress interpretive over descriptive writing. Interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary perspectives are welcome.

If you have something that you would consider appropriate to the project, I would love to hear about it.  I was wanting to get all the abstracts in by Oct. 15.  If you could e-mail a 300-word proposal to carvajp@auburn.edu by then, that would be great.  If you need additional guidance and interaction before you fully develop your proposal, I’m also available.  

Let me know if you have any questions. And if you know of anyone who would be interested in this project, feel free to forward this information.

John Carvalho

Professor of Journalism

Auburn University

carvajp@auburn.edu

Book on Yoga and Popular Culture Seeks Contributors

Yoga in Popular Culture (edited collection)
 
Seeking contributors for an edited volume on yoga in popular culture. This book is envisioned as a cross-disciplinary collection of scholarly work on yoga, with essays that explore the ways that yoga has reflected and changed popular culture in the West.
 
Yoga is experiencing its third “boom” in the United States. The first boom, at the turn of the 20th century, was marked by salons and contributed to interest in Orientalism, the occult, and physical culture. This boom ended during the depression. The second boom grew out of free love and communal living in the 1960s. This spawned interest in transcendental meditation and paralleled the burgeoning fitness movement. The third boom followed soon after, riding on the coattails of the credentialing movement in the health and fitness industry along with the growth in integrative medicine. Yoga teacher trainings grew into a viable business and yoga instruction began to cross over into medial education and healthcare to combat stress. Throughout each of these periods, yoga has held a place in the pursuit of spiritual and physical health as well as the popular culture of the day.
 
Yoga has been a driving force of change. While it serves as a vehicle for personal transformation, it has also become an opportunity for entrepreneurship. Commodification and commercialization of yoga would seem to contradict the teachings of ancient texts upon which the practice is rooted. Yoga can simultaneously be a spiritual pursuit and fitness practice. While there is potential for conflict between the traditionalists who promote authentic yoga and the growing fitness yoga market, a broader spectrum of yoga practice exists. This creates a paradox across yoga culture.
 
Cross-disciplinary contributors are sought from areas including (but not limited to) sociology, anthropology, history, communication, media studies, religious studies, exercise science, theatre, dance, education, health professions, medicine, business and finance. Please note that first person essays on self-transformation through yoga will not be considered. Contributors must be willing to commit to a 6,500 word paper on a scholarly examination of any topic relevant to yoga in popular culture.
 
Submission instructions: Send a 600-750 word abstract along with a 500 word bio in the text of an email to virginia.cowen@rutgers.edu. Do not include attachments. Please include complete contact information for principal author and put “Yoga in Pop Culture Proposal” in the subject line of the email. Deadline to submit abstracts is June 2, 2017. Authors of selected abstracts will be asked to submit a 5,000 – 6,500 word paper by October 2, 2017.

Racism and Discrimination in Sports CFP

Racism and Discrimination in the Sporting World – An interdisciplinary volume to be edited by Professor of French and Fulbright Scholar Eileen M. Angelini, Ph.D., Canisius College

What is it about culture and society that creates an environment in which an athlete is able to excel or fail in his/her respective sport?  Which factors, such as racism, discrimination, financial advantage or hardship, propel or hinder an athlete’s achievements?  This volume seeks to explore how the world of sports is often a microcosm of the real world and the many ways in which it uniquely reflects cultural and societal issues.  Abstracts are welcomed from all disciplines.

Abstract Due Dates: Preference will be given to abstracts received by October 15, 2016 and should be no longer than 300 words.  Please also include a brief biographical statement and a CV.

Final manuscripts (no longer than 15,000 words, including Works Cited) should be submitted in MLA style, by December 15, 2016.

Send inquires and abstracts to:  eangelini1@verizon.net

The volume is scheduled for publication in February 2017 by Universitas Press, Montreal