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World war One Symposium

Armistice & Aftermath: A World War One Symposium

Sept. 28-29, 2018 at Michigan Technological University, Houghton MI

Call For Papers

Armistice Day 2018 marks the centenary end of World War I. This symposium explores the conditions and impacts of the “Great War,” as experienced during and afterwards, with a special focus on the perspective from the American Heartland. The war had tremendous human and economic repercussions. It also motivated technological, medical, and cultural advances, and it paved the way for transformative social change, from Prohibition to women’s suffrage.

Keynote speakersDr. John H. Morrow, Jr., Franklin Professor of History, University of Georgia. Author (with Jeffrey T. Sammons) of Harlem’s Rattlers and the Great War: The Undaunted 369th Regiment and the African American Quest for Equality (2014) and Dr. Lynn Dumenil, Robert Glass Cleland Professor Emerita of American History, Occidental College. Author of The Second Line of Defense: American Women and World War I(2017).

We invite papers that examine a wide range of topics such as, but not limited to

●      Domestic and regional mobilization and demobilization Social implications of technologies and industries of war

●      Reintegration and post-war shifts in gender, class, and labor relations

●      Cultural representations of war, home-front support, and life in the aftermath

●      Memories of the war in music, literature, film, drama, art, graphic arts

●      Civil rights, social stratifications, and diversity in the military and civilian life

●      The peace and anti-war movements

Please spread the word by forwarding this announcement.

DEADLINE FOR 350-500 WORD ABSTRACT: May 1, 2018

Please include a brief biography.

Submit to ww1cc.mtu.edu/cfp

Accepted papers may be published as Proceedings in the Michigan Tech Digital Commons. Selected revised papers may be included in a proposal for a published collection.

There is no registration fee for attendance.

Approval for State Continuing Education Clock Hours (SCECHs) is pending. More details will be available once the program is finalized.

CONTACT INFORMATION

WW1CC • Dr. Patty Sotirin • (906) 487-3264

Department of Humanities Michigan Technological University

A series of free and public exhibits and installations will take place at Michigan Tech and the Carnegie Museum of the Keweenaw during the symposium.

●      Europe, America, and the World: An Outdoor Concert. Featuring the music of James Reese Europe performed by MTU Superior Wind Symphony, MTU

●      An Evening of Silent Film. Featuring Charlie Chaplin’s Shoulder Arms (1918) with live musical accompaniment, Rozsa Theater

●      Interactive WWI Trench. With battle soundscape, readings from soldiers’ memoirs, and war poetry, MTU

●      American and French Propaganda Posters and the Great War. Exhibit, Rozsa Gallery, courtesy of Marquette Regional History Center

●      Shell-shocked: Footage and Sounds of the Front. Film with sound installation, Rozsa Gallery

●      Philosophy, Technology, & Warfare. A multimedia screens exhibit, Immersive Visualization Studio, MTU

●      Soldier Stories: The U.P. in World War I. Exhibit, Carnegie Museum of the Keweenaw, courtesy of Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center

●      World War I & the Copper Country Home Front. Exhibit, Carnegie Museum of the Keweenaw

●      Copper Country Voices of Dissent in the Great War. Exhibit, Finnish American Heritage Center, Finlandia University

WW1CC is made possible in part by a grant from the Michigan Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily reflect those of the National Endowment for the Humanities or the Michigan Humanities Council.

Black Radicalism Conference

New York City April 14-15

Details found here: http://www.rosalux-nyc.org/black-radicalism-in-the-united-states/ 

CFP: The Fantastic for NEPCA

Fantastic (Fantasy, Horror, and Science Fiction) Area

Eleventh-Anniversary and Farewell Sessions

 

2018 Conference of the Northeast Popular Culture/American Culture Association (NEPCA)

Worcester State University, Worcester, Massachusetts

19-20 October 2018

Proposals due 1 June 2018

 

Formed in 2008, the Fantastic (Fantasy, Horror, and Science Fiction) Area will hold its eleventh-anniversary and farewell sessions in 2018, and we seek proposals from scholars of all levels for papers and/or panels that explore any aspect of the intermedia traditions of the fantastic (including, but not limited to, elements of fairy tale, fantasy, gothic, horror, legend, mythology, and science fiction) and how creative artists have altered our preconceptions of these subtraditions by producing innovative works in diverse countries, media, and time periods and for audiences at all levels.

Presentations will be limited to 15 or 20 minutes in length depending on final panel size.

An archive of previous work in the area exists at our website Northeast Fantastic (https://northeastfantastic.blogspot.com), which is intended as a gateway to furthering research on the fantastic.

 

Special Topics:

Given the proximity of the conference to Halloween, we are always interested in proposals related to monsters and the monstrous.

This year, we are also looking for papers related to the fantastic in children’s culture, especially the works of the Walt Disney Company.

Furthermore, in celebration of the two hundredth anniversary of the publication of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein in 2018, we are organizing a special session devoted to “Frankenstein 1818 to 2018: 200 Years of Mad Scientists and Monsters.” Details can at our outreach site Frankenstein and the Fantastic at https://FrankensteinandtheFantastic.blogspot.com/.

 

Directions for Submission:

Please contact area chair Michael A. Torregrossa at cfp.nepcafantastic@gmail.com, using “NEPCA Fantastic 2018” as your subject line, with any questions in advance of the 1 June 2018 deadline.

Submissions for papers and/or panels should be made online through the “2018 Proposal Form” at https://nepca.blog/2018-conference/. Please select “The Fantastic (Fantasy, Horror, and Science Fiction)” as your designated area. A complete submission includes contact information, academic affiliation (if any), an academic biographical statement (between 50 and 200 words), a paper title (no more than 60 characters), and a paper abstract (no more than 250 words). Do also send copies of your biography and proposal to the area chair at cfp.nepcafantastic@gmail.com, using “NEPCA Fantastic 2018” as your subject line.

 

 

The Northeast Popular/American Culture Association (a.k.a. NEPCA) was founded in 1974 as a professional organization for scholars living in New England and New York. It is a community of scholars interested in advancing research and promoting interest in the disciplines of popular and/or American culture. NEPCA’s membership consists of university and college faculty members, emeriti faculty, secondary school teachers, museum specialists, graduate students, independent scholars, and interested members of the general public. NEPCA is an independently funded affiliate of the Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association. Membership is open to all interested parties, regardless of profession, rank, or residency. NEPCA holds an annual conference that invites scholars from around the globe to participate. In an effort to keep costs low, it meets on college campuses throughout the region.

 

Membership in NEPCA is required for participation and annual dues are included in conference registration fees. Further details are available at https://nepca.blog/membership-information/.

Monsters and Medievalism CFP

Sponsored by The Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture for the Medieval & Renaissance Area of the Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association

29th Annual Conference of the Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association

Lord Baltimore Hotel, Baltimore, Maryland

8-10 November 2018

Proposals due by 30 June 2018

Monsters remain fascinating subjects, and intense discussion in recent years has focused on their representation in medieval texts, including stories as well as the art of the period. However, scholars have largely neglected the post-medieval afterlife of these horrors in later works. Monstrous entities manufactured to exist within re-creations of the Middle Ages in contemporary media share a similar fate in the academy. In short, medievalists appear to like monsters, but they do not always seem willing to explore their depictions in modern texts. Despite this neglect, the monsters found in medievalisms have merit in our classrooms and research, and we need to promote their exploits as well as those of the creatures existing within medieval artifacts.

In furtherance of the goals of The Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture, we seek in this panel to unite Medieval Studies, Medievalism Studies, Monster Studies, and Popular Culture Studies to highlight connections between medieval monstrosities and their post-medieval incarnations and successors. We hope to explore both continuity and change in addressing how terrors rooted in the medieval have been portrayed and how their inheritors have been developed.

Possible topics might include:

Demons

Dracula

Dragons

Elves/Fairies/Tuatha Dé Danann

Fomorians

Gargoyles

Giants

Golems

The Green Knight

The Grendelkin

Incubi/Sucubi

Loathly Ladies

Melusine

Merlin

Revenants

Shrek

Werewolves

Wild Men / Wild Women

Witches

Presentations will be limited to 10-15 minutes depending on final panel size.

Interested individuals should, no later than 30 June 2018, notify the organizers of their topic via email directed to MedievalinPopularCulture@gmail.com using “Monsters and Medievalism” as their subject heading. They will also need create an account with the Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association at https://mapaca.net/conference AND submit into the system both an abstract of no more than 300 words and an academic biographical narrative of no more than 75 words.

Again, please send inquiries and copies of your submissions to the organizers at MedievalinPopularCulture@gmail.com using “Monsters and Medievalism” as the subject heading.

In planning your proposal, please be aware of the policies of the Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association (available at https://mapaca.net/help/conference/submitting-abstracts-conference).

Further details on The Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture can be found at its website: https://medievalinpopularculture.blogspot.com/.

Sponsored by The Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture for the Medieval & Renaissance Area of the Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association

29th Annual Conference of the Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association

Lord Baltimore Hotel, Baltimore, Maryland

8-10 November 2018

Proposals due by 30 June 2018

Monsters remain fascinating subjects, and intense discussion in recent years has focused on their representation in medieval texts, including stories as well as the art of the period. However, scholars have largely neglected the post-medieval afterlife of these horrors in later works. Monstrous entities manufactured to exist within re-creations of the Middle Ages in contemporary media share a similar fate in the academy. In short, medievalists appear to like monsters, but they do not always seem willing to explore their depictions in modern texts. Despite this neglect, the monsters found in medievalisms have merit in our classrooms and research, and we need to promote their exploits as well as those of the creatures existing within medieval artifacts.

In furtherance of the goals of The Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture, we seek in this panel to unite Medieval Studies, Medievalism Studies, Monster Studies, and Popular Culture Studies to highlight connections between medieval monstrosities and their post-medieval incarnations and successors. We hope to explore both continuity and change in addressing how terrors rooted in the medieval have been portrayed and how their inheritors have been developed.

Possible topics might include:

Demons

Dracula

Dragons

Elves/Fairies/Tuatha Dé Danann

Fomorians

Gargoyles

Giants

Golems

The Green Knight

The Grendelkin

Incubi/Sucubi

Loathly Ladies

Melusine

Merlin

Revenants

Shrek

Werewolves

Wild Men / Wild Women

Witches

Presentations will be limited to 10-15 minutes depending on final panel size.

Interested individuals should, no later than 30 June 2018, notify the organizers of their topic via email directed to MedievalinPopularCulture@gmail.com using “Monsters and Medievalism” as their subject heading. They will also need create an account with the Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association at https://mapaca.net/conference AND submit into the system both an abstract of no more than 300 words and an academic biographical narrative of no more than 75 words.

Again, please send inquiries and copies of your submissions to the organizers at MedievalinPopularCulture@gmail.com using “Monsters and Medievalism” as the subject heading.

In planning your proposal, please be aware of the policies of the Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association (available at https://mapaca.net/help/conference/submitting-abstracts-conference).

Further details on The Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture can be found at its website: https://medievalinpopularculture.blogspot.com/.

Call for Papers: Media Literacy Conference

Northeast Regional Media Literacy Conference 2018

The Northeast Regional Media Literacy Conference (NRMLC) invites session proposals from media literacy practitioners related to critical media literacy. Sessions will be interactive, media-driven, digitally-designed, engaging, and inspiring.

The goals for the 2018 conference are:

  • to generate new strategies in media observation, analysis, and learning;
  • to pose solutions to problems that face our media-influenced society.

This year’s theme is —

Media Literacy in Times of Uncertainty

Saturday, November 10, 2018

University of Rhode Island

Providence Campus

80 Washington St, Providence, RI 02903

The Northeast Regional Media Literacy Conference invites K-12 educators, higher education faculty, school library media specialists, librarians, after school program leaders, media professionals, researchers, cultural workers, and college students to collaborate about the potential and challenges for media literacy and its essential role in education today.

Animals and the Left CFP

One-Day Workshop, NYU Animal Studies

29 June 2018, New York City

Organisers: Sunaura Taylor (NYU), Troy Vettese (NYU), and Alyssa Battistoni (Yale)

In 1917 Rosa Luxemburg wrote to a friend from her prison cell in Breslau:

The hide of a buffalo is proverbial for its toughness and thickness, but this tough skin had been broken. During the unloading, all the animals stood there, quite still, exhausted, and the one that was bleeding kept staring into the empty space in front of him with an expression on his black face and in his soft, black eyes like an abused child. It was precisely the expression of a child that has been punished and doesn’t know why or what for, doesn’t know how to get away from this torment and raw violence.

She, however, was far from the only revolutionary to ponder the plight of animals within broader systems of oppression. Karl Marx studied how early capitalism transformed animals’ bodies to maximise production of fat and flesh. A century after Marx toiled in the British Library, Cesar Chavez organised farm workers in California and later became a vegan, a stance he considered inseparable from his broader politics. Another Californian, Angela Davis, is not only a leading Marxist theorist and activist, but also a notable vegan. Yet, despite this lineage, Marxists have largely shied from carrying out scholarship and activism for animals. This has left animal-rights as the prerogative of other traditions, such as utilitarianism, rights theory, virtue theory, and care theory. Indeed, many Leftists breezily dismiss animal-rights as an example of bourgeois sentimentality.

There is hope! Some excellent works have been written, such as Ashley Dawson’s Extinction, Sunaura Taylor’s Beasts of Burden, Kenneth Fish’s Living Factories, Donna Haraway’s When Species Meet, and Frank Wilderson III’s ‘Gramsci’s Black Marx.’ What we want is to deepen these connections between Left theory and practice to animal-rights. We are most interested in analyses using approaches from Marxism, post-Marxism, Frankfurt School, post-structuralism, queer theory, Afro-pessimism, Afro-futurism, Afro-veganism, disability studies, Karl Polanyi, feminism, anarchism, and other radicalisms. We invite scholars, writers, and activists working on these themes, especially those who live in New York City and its environs as we have limited funds for travel subsidies (but come from afar if you can finance your voyage).

The keynote will be given by film-maker and writer, Astra Taylor.

Please come to share your work on activist campaigns, poetry, ethnography, journalistic investigations, scientific experiments, essays, and academic articles. Projects in all stages of completion will be considered. Please send a three-hundred word abstract and a short CV to Troy (tgv208@nyu.edu) by February 28.

Hockey Conference

The Hockey Conference is a biennial event held at various locations throughout North America. It has instrumentally advanced scholarship on ice hockey, and brings together hockey scholars and community members interested in or working in hockey. The upcoming conference will be hosted by Dr. Cheryl A. MacDonald of the University of Alberta’s Faculty of Education in Edmonton, Canada.

The conference committee invites abstract submissions from scholars in various fields whose work engages with the sport of hockey, in all its diverse forms, in a multitude of ways. These can include, but are not limited to, historical, empirical, conceptual, and artistic approaches to the sport. This is the second and last call for abstracts; please submit them to Dr. Cheryl MacDonald at cheryl3@ualberta.ca by Friday March 16th. A key theme of the conference is diversity and inclusion; however, all abstracts are most welcome.

 

Hockey is played and experienced in variety of manners. In some ways, it is ever changing. In others, it remains timelessly the same. Like many aspects of the social world, it can be influenced by factors such as globalization, the economic market, health and safety concerns, and the identities of those participating in it. Although diversity and inclusion will be highlighted, the conference will provide an interdisciplinary forum for researchers to present their work and facilitate discussion surrounding topics such as the following:

 

  • Analytics                                                                                                    –    History
  • Business and economics                                                                          –    Literature
  • Coaching                                                                                                   –    Management
  • Community building and development                                                      –    Media
  • Embodiment and ability                                                                             –    Popular culture
  • Family                                                                                                        –    Race and ethnicity
  • Gender and sexuality                                                                                 –    And more…
  • Globalization

 

 

Guidelines:
–      Abstracts should be 150-250 words and include a presentation title
–      Please provide your name, institutional affiliation, and contact information on the abstract
–      Multiple abstract submissions are permitted
–      The final deadline is Friday March 16th
–       Submissions and questions can be directed to Cheryl MacDonald at cheryl3@ualberta.ca