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CFP Children in the Films of Steven Spielberg

Collection title: Children in the Films of Steven Spielberg

Editors: Adrian Schober and Debbie Olson

Children are an almost essential feature of the landscape in the films of Steven Spielberg: from the alien-abducted Barry in Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977) and Elliott and his unearthly alter-ego in E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial (1982), to the war-damaged Jim in Empire of the Sun (1987), the lost mecha child David in A.I. Artificial Intelligence (2001), and the eponymous boy hero of The Adventures of Tintin (2011). There are many other instances across Spielberg’s oeuvre. And contrary to his reputation as a purveyor of innocuous ‘popcorn’ entertainment, Spielberg’s vision of children/childhood is not all sweetness and light. Indeed, more discerning critics have noted the darker underpinnings of this vision, often fraught with tensions, conflicts and anxieties. While childhood is Spielberg’s principal source of inspiration, his ‘subject matter,’ this has never been the focus of a collection. We therefore seek an original article addressing both the ‘light’ and ‘dark’ aspects of childhood, or the interplay between childhood/adulthood in Spielberg’s Hook. Our collection currently contains an impressive range of articles, but we feel an article on Hook would be an important addition to our collection.

We seek full essays or near complete essays that can be ready for submission to the publisher by end of September 2015. Deadline for submission isSeptember 6th, 2015. Send essay as a word doc to Adrian Schober, beatles9@optusnet.com.au or Debbie Olson, dolson@uta.edu

This collection to be published by Lexington Books in the “Children and Youth in Popular Culture” series.


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